3 tips for getting your teen road ready

At some point in the future, all parents will have to think about helping their child to pass their driving licence and get on the road. The issue is that most people have no idea where to start when it comes to assisting their loved ones. So, use some of the tips below to ensure you give your kids all the support they require.

 Take them out in your car

 Alongside their official driving lessons, parents should consider taking their kids out for a drive whenever they get a spare few minutes. Try to head to shopping center car parks and places where there isn’t a lot of traffic. Those extra hours spent in your vehicle should mean your little ones pass their test as quickly as possible.

 Test their theory knowledge

 It’s vital that all drivers understand road theory, and there are many textbooks and smartphone applications available to assist with learning. However, parents can help their kids by testing them during the evenings before they go to bed. Make sure you get involved!

Get them a car

 Human beings are sometimes like donkeys in the fact that you have to dangle a carrot to get them to move in the right direction. Getting a car for your child ahead of time could encourage them to get on the road much faster than they otherwise would have done.

 So, now you just have to put that advice into action to ensure your child passes their test. You can also check out the infographic below for information on the most cost-effective ways to get a car.

 

Created by auto.loan

Pregnant ladies: Are you “mom bod” ready?

Pregnant ladies: Are you “mom bod” ready?

Most women are warned time and time again of just how hard pregnancy and giving birth can be on the body. Even when the birth itself is relatively straightforward and trauma-free, it’s a fairly dramatic time for the body. The new mom bod isn’t just one that isn’t quite as tight and toned as it used to be. You can face a plethora of changes that can range from curious to downright worrying. Here, we’re going to look at some of the changes you can expect, including those that no-one has told you about.

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What not to worry about

Immediately after giving birth, there are going to be a few noticeable differences. For instance, you might find yourself losing more hair than ever before, with a pillow that’s littered with it. When you’re pregnant, your body is full of hormones that tend to reduce the natural hair loss we all have, making it noticeably more voluminous. The accelerated hair loss you might see after is just the body catching up with itself. The same is true for increased nighttime sweating. Your body is still storing a lot of fluids and it will take any opportunity to discharge them. Just in case you weren’t aware, permanent increases in breast and feet size is also to be expected.

After the motherly glow fades

The same brew of hormones that keeps our hair thick and glossy will also give us the “glow” that many people notice on pregnant women. However, it’s not often as pretty after we’ve had the baby. Melasma, also known as the “mask of pregnancy”, is the most common, manifesting as patches of more pigment in areas of the face. This discoloration never truly goes away but does fade over time and can be helped with better skin protection from UV rays and a diet rich in vitamins C, A, and E. There are other skin conditions common after pregnancy, such as hormonal acne, facial spider veins, and dry skin. These are all temporary, however. Dry skin can be treated immediately, while the former two may take months to rebalance.

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Activity is never not important

Heavily pregnant mothers should get plenty of rest and make sure they’re never pushing themselves too hard. However, the idea that you should have no exercise during pregnancy simply isn’t true. Certain pre-natal exercises can help you deal with the stresses of being pregnant and even help ease the process of birth. Post-pregnancy, you should visit MomsIntoFitness.com for help to get your body back to good condition. It’s not just about looks, but about helping to restore energy reserves and stamina after birth. Many mothers do suffer a general deterioration in physical health because they don’t exercise after pregnancy. Exercise will also help you lose the mom belly, but don’t think about trying to rush that. The increased size of the uterus has a lot to do with that belly and it needs time on its own to shrink back down.

Back to basics

One of the most common aches related to pregnancy is back pain. After all, you’ve been carrying a growing baby for nine months and, postpartum, you will be carrying them in your arms a lot. If you have back pain, there are plenty of factors to consider. Changing to a comfier bed and a chair that offers more support, for instance. Massage therapy and low impact exercises like gentle yoga can help de-stress the muscles and build a little strength and posture so your lower back doesn’t have to take all the strain.

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Shutting off the waterworks

It’s one of the slightly more embarrassing sides of having pushed a living human being out, but a lot of women suffer from incontinence for some time after pregnancy. There are a lot of different reasons for this as FitPregnancy.com shows, the most common being that this particular part of the body has been under a lot of stress and might be weaker than before. Kegel exercises can be hugely effective for managing this issue. However, if there’s considerable pain or discomfort while you pee, it might be the sign of a urinary tract infection or something else that warrants seeing your doctor.

The other kind of leaking

Not every woman suffers from temporary incontinence after pregnancy. The vast majority of them, however, will soon experience the well-known milk leaks from their breasts. Even women who don’t breastfeed are still going to be rather full of the stuff, so leaks are to be expected. Some only leak for a few weeks, others will keep leaking for months. There’s nothing wrong with them, so all you should really think about doing is anticipating them and making them a little less noticeable. You can stem leaks when you feel them coming by applying pressure to your breasts by hugging them with your arms. Otherwise, it’s a good idea to start choosing clothes that can disguise wetness. If you do leak, don’t use disposable nursing pads which can keep your nipples damp, resulting in soreness and infections. Use cloth pads instead.

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Not in the mood

It’s not as high a priority as some of the other issues on the list, but many women grow concerned about having a much lower sex drive after pregnancy. But there are plenty of reasons you might not be in the most intimate of moods. New mothers suffer plenty of stress and worry, for one, aided by hormonal fluctuations, as Parents.com states. Breastfeeding can also decrease estrogen levels in the body, which can go on to lower your sex drive. Instead, focus on non-sexual intimacy such as massages and cuddling in the meantime. In a few months, your level of desire should right itself. If it doesn’t, then see your gynecologist.

Just as it’s important to keep a close eye on your health and bodily changes during pregnancy, you should be acutely aware of any differences after you’ve had your baby. Never hesitate to ask your doctor or midwife about those changes, either. Many of the examples listed above are considered normal, but that doesn’t mean that you should skip getting a professional opinion on them.

Important things to teach your children about finances before they grow up

Important things to teach your children about finances before they grow up

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As a parent, one of the best things you can ever possibly do for your kids, apart from loving them and providing for them while they’re young, is to give them a solid grounding in managing money and achieving financial stability.

Knowing how to manage money wisely is a skill that could help us all to avoid a lot of difficult situations throughout our lives, so it seems strange that so few of us take the time to sit out kids down and tell them about budgeting, the pros and cons of credit and how to manage one’s finances so that one is never short of money.

If you want your kids to grow into responsible adults who don’t struggle with money worries more than they really have to, here are some simple things you should aim to teach them about money before they grow up and leave home:

No One Owes You Anything

One of the most important lessons anyone, let alone children, can learn about money is that no one owes you anything. A lot of children right now are growing up in environments where their every whim is catered to, and they always get what they want. These kids are going to have a rude awakening when they grow up and realize that they have to make it on their own. That’s why you should, right now, start drumming into them the fact that, if you want something, you have to be willing to work for it. You can do this by giving them an allowance only after they’ve completed certain chores and doing so will stand them in good stead for the future.

Debt Should be a Last Resort

With the exceptions of things like mortgages and student loans, which actually enhance life for most of us, and make us better able to reach financial stability, debts are something that should be used as a last resort only when absolutely essential. If you do take out an online loan, buy something with your credit card or borrow money from someone, then you will have to spend many months and years paying back not only your debt, but also the interest it accrues, which is why you should build up an emergency fund to cover any unexpected expenses. Sources of credit are always available should they really be needed, but it is never something that should be relied upon over and above good personal financial practices.

Everyone Should Have an Emergency Fund

When you’re young, you feel like nothing bad is ever going to happen to you and you tend to live in the moment. This isn’t a bad way to live, and I’m sure we’d all be happier for our kids to think in this way than for them to worry endlessly about the future, but when it comes to money, things are a bit different.

If you want to do your kids a really big favor for the future, start talking to them about the importance of putting a little money away each month into an emergency fund, which will cushion them should a financial storm hit which requires them to find a significant sum of money fast.

Money Can’t Buy You Happiness

Having enough money to pay the bills, put food on the table, and yes have a few of the finer things in life is what most of us strive for and to the extent that it keeps the wolves from the door and stops us from struggling it can buy us some happiness, but if you use money and buying lots of unnecessary stuff like designer clothes, flashy cars and overly expensive vacations in a bid to beat the blues and boost your mood, it is almost certain to fail. If you’re unhappy or depressed, you’ll still feel just as blue wearing a Prada dress as you will find a simple outfit and you might have the added worry of being short of funds, or even worse in debt. This is something that kids need to understand as soon as possible if they are to avoid going a little crazy in the spending stakes when they start earning their own money.

Live Simply

Life can seem pretty complicated at times, and we are all constantly bombarded with goods and services that promise to make our lives a little easier, but you know what? Nothing Makes live easier than living simply, buying only what you need and what you can afford, with the occasional(affordable) indulgence thrown in. If you live simply, you never have to worry about being over your head in debt, keeping up with the Joneses or trying to earn ever larger sums of money – you can just kick back and enjoy life.

Take Care of Your Credit

Kids need to learn that there can be lifelong repercussions to going crazy with credit cards or living on debt. They need to know that if you ruin your credit score by the time you’re 21, it could take a decade or more before it recovers and that means that you might not be able to get a home loan, car loan or even certain jobs, particularly those in the financial sector because of it. If you need to use credit, then you must be confident you can pay it back and make every effort to do so if you don’t want to mess up all areas of your life for years to come.

You Shouldn’t Judge People on Their Wealth

Judging people by how much money they make or how little they have in the bank is something that only shallow people do, and it is much more important to judge people on their character, which actually matters, than whether they have the latest car or the most expensive clothing. Teaching your kids this could help them to avoid the well-worn path of getting into more and more debt to keep up appearances and outdo their peers.

A Big Salary Isn’t Everything

Although earning a good living is something we should all strive for, a good living doesn’t necessarily mean the biggest salary you can get, and actually, it can often be worth taking a lower paying job that you love if it means you’ll get out of bed happy every day, enjoy your work and get to spend more time with your family.

Saving for the Future is Something You Should Do Now

If your kids start saving towards their future as soon as they have access to their own money, life will be easier, they won’t have to work quite so hard in the future, and they won’t have to worry about their financial future at least. So, teach them the value of saving as soon as you can!

Teach your kids these simple truths about money and chances are they’ll grow into bright, confident, money savvy adults – what more could you want?

 

 

YOU’RE doing GREAT!

So the other day I walked past the bathroom mirror and almost passed out at the sight of my own grossness. Yes, it happens to the best of us. As I sit here I am currently un-showered and actively avoiding the pile of laundry over in that direction. Don’t look.

This horrific reality and my realization that Pinterest is just there to make me feel bad about myself, has prompted me to stop being so hard on myself and give me a good ‘ol pat on the dirty sweaty back….

And I’m giving you one too! I’m over on KidsGoals.com handing out virtual hugs and cookies and telling you that YOU ARE DOING A GREAT JOB, MOM!

A Mother’s Story: Down Syndrome

A Mother’s Story: Down Syndrome

I have always loved to have guest writers here on my blog to highlight other mothers in an effort to educate and enlighten not only myself, but all you wonderful people as well. Today we are hearing from my husband’s cousin who at exactly 2 weeks to the day after my Audrey was born, their family welcomed little Lacey into the world. This is the first time Kelley has spoken so candidly and openly about what it was like to hear the diagnosis and how it changed their family forever. At the end I am including the speech her 11-year-old daughter Sydney wrote about her baby sister for a school speech contest…and it won first place. 

I was shocked when Nicole asked me to write this post for her blog because let’s just say writing is not my thing. I was also nervous because I didn’t want people to get the wrong idea about how I felt about my daughter the day she was born.  But I feel there are other parents in the world that need to know it’s ok to have certain thoughts, feelings and fears when it comes to having a child with special needs. And know that regardless of her diagnosis, you will love your child unconditionally and take on anyone that will doubt her abilities.

Let me be very clear here, I have loved my daughter from the first time I found out I was going to be a mother for the third time, but the time after her birth was probably one of the hardest I have had to endure (with the exception of the recent loss of my father). This is my story on how I dealt with my daughter being born with Down syndrome.

March 24, 2010 at 6:31 PM I became a member of “The Club” as my friend Kelli likes to say. It’s not a club I planned to become a member of and it’s a club that caused me many tears that first year after becoming a member. You see, that night I gave birth to a healthy baby girl with Down syndrome.

To say it was a total shock would be a lie, you see 20 weeks before that night I received a call in my office from my doctor to say that my QUAD screen was positive giving me a possible 1 in 90 chance that my unborn baby would be born with Down Syndrome. At this point the doctor needed to know what I wanted to do since I had refused all genetic testing at the beginning of my pregnancy. Please know that abortion was never a thought in my mind and thankfully I had a wonderful doctor who never once suggested that I abort my baby. My husband and I had decided on genetic counseling and then genetic ultrasound, from there we would decide if we wanted more testing.

The week before Thanksgiving we went for our genetic counseling and genetic ultrasound. I had prepared myself with a list of questions I could ask regarding terms like nuchal fold thickness, cardiac abnormalities, duodenal atresia, hyprechogenic bowel, bilateral renal pyelectosis, brachiocephaly, or choriod plexus cysts. All markers that were typically seen with an unborn baby with Down syndrome.

We had already had a regular ultrasound but we never were able to find out the sex because this baby was very active. Throughout, I kept saying ‘an active baby is a healthy baby!’ And I couldn’t help but laugh when they told my husband Jeff and I that we will be adding another daughter to the two we already had. We never cared if it was a boy or girl, we just wanted our baby to be healthy and because they did not find any strong or soft markers we decided not to have a risky amino.

I wish I could say I enjoyed my last 20 weeks of my third pregnancy but that would be a lie. My gut instinct told me to be prepared even though the only thing that was positive was my QUAD screen. I worried myself sick those last 20 weeks. I was sick all the time, I gained a significant amount of weight and cried a lot in the shower.

The day I went into labor with my baby girl I had pink eye and bronchitis. I delivered via c-section and when the nurse brought Lacey Catherine into the recovery room I knew that my world would forever be changed. I would never be the same person that had walked into that hospital just four hours ago, laughing carelessly about the crazy day we had. No, I was now going to be a mother with a child with special needs and I would never again look at things the same. Words that never bothered me before would make my skin crawl because I now had a daughter with Down syndrome.

I didn’t want to open my mouth and say anything because then I knew it would all really be true and I didn’t want it to be. I didn’t want to join “the club”. I just remember feeling like the recovery room was getting smaller and smaller with each breath I was taking and my anxiety was taking over. I wanted to get up and run away pretending this day never happened but because of the spinal block I couldn’t move. I thought if I could just close my eyes I would wake up and hopefully this nightmare was over.

All of our immediate family got to see Lacey and no one said anything so I thought maybe I was crazy and she was normal. Even Jeff had stayed quiet. But when I saw the look on the nurse’s face and the doctor came to talk with us I knew what he was going to say. At that point I just wanted to scream, cry, hit something and argue that the ultrasounds didn’t show anything.

I was in total shock and I couldn’t stop thinking about how everyone would react to the news. I remember thinking how she will be treated differently, all because she has this extra chromosome. People will not love her the way they love her sisters. Will they even want to hold her? Will she know if they are not comfortable with a baby with Down syndrome? I didn’t want people to make fun of my daughter or call her “retarded” or whatever other horrific things people say. I don’t want people to look at me with pity because I had a baby born with an extra chromosome. I remember being wheeled to my room and I kept saying to myself, “You are not going to cry” because Lacey’s sisters will not understand why their mother would be so upset.

My sister-in-law took the girls out of the room, so we could tell other family members the news. I never did cry in front of anyone, I felt I had to show I was strong and that I could handle this. I remember looking at my husband and it was the first time I saw him cry and it broke my heart into a million pieces because I feared it meant he wouldn’t love her.  Man, how wrong I was. Jeff cried because the ultrasounds never showed anything was wrong and he was angry. But he soon shook it off and from that day on he has been totally in love with his little miracle. Jeff has said we can handle anything they throw at us, so we know Lacy will be fine because we are her parents. I remember thinking all she needs is love from us and everything else will fall into place.

Soon after she was born there was a concern from the Doctor about Lacey and I remember hearing the word Leukemia being said. I was in such a daze I didn’t understand, but basically the Doctor said that Lacey’s white blood cell count was up and that she was also showing immature white blood cells in her blood and her platelet count was low.

In the end, Lacey’s body fought back and her counts went back to normal but my greatest fear is because of this my daughter now has a 30% increased risk for developing a type of Leukemia called nonlymphoid by the time she is three years old. We recently had her tested early and at this time her blood count is normal. I can deal with her extra chromosome but I can’t imagine watching my baby girl go through chemotherapy. That is a bridge we will pray we never have to cross. The other issue we had during her first 6 months of life was trying to keep weight up. She had lost almost 2 pounds and we had to go to the Doctor every week. It’s funny to say now but we would cheer if she gained an ounce. Then we went to Florida when she was 6 weeks old at which time she gained 2 pounds while we were gone and from there she continued to gradually gain weight.

Lacey was also born with a few heart defects but at 6 months of age her PDA finally closed which meant no heart surgery. There were many other tests we had to have that first year: hearing, vision, blood work to check her thyroid. These test she continues to have every 6 months. It seemed like the time we would spend that first year at Dayton Children’s Hospital in Dayton Ohio would never end. At four weeks old Lacy began seeing a developmental specialist for physical and occupational therapy and continues to receive these therapies in addition to speech therapy.

The whole first year there are a lot of things we had to learn and go through which at times were very confusing and frustrating. I didn’t join a support group, because that is not my thing, but I know for a lot of people it’s helpful. I am just not a ‘support group’ kind of person and chose my own way of dealing with what my family was going though.

One of my best friends happens to be the President of the Miami Valley Down Syndrome Association and she has been an amazing support system for me. I also started to research and read different books regarding Down syndrome. One that I found that helped me with the guilt I was feeling over my own emotions was The Year My Son and I Were Born: A Story of Down Syndrome, Motherhood and Self-Discovery by Katheryn Lynard Soper.

Reading all the information you are given is a great help but honestly, I could live with out the scary stuff that may, or may not, happen to my daughter. I just wanted to enjoy her and I was afraid that maybe reading everything would take that away. It can be overwhelming all the things you need to be aware of but we have truly been blessed with the state of Lacey’s health.

People should not mistake having Down Syndrome with not being healthy.  My daughter is very healthy. She has met a lot of her milestones and in some areas she has surpassed them. She rolled over at the age of 2 ½ weeks and never stopped. She walked by 17 months. She said “love you” at seven months to her dad. I laugh because they have always said “she will be slow” but anyone that knows my daughter knows that being slow is just not in her, she has one speed; fast. Her biggest delay has been in her speech but sign language has helped with the lack of verbal skills.

Lacey is an amazing child and I used to feel guilt over the many tears I cried because of her diagnosis but in the end it was because of the ideas that society has placed on people with Down syndrome, that sadly, I also believed. Once she entered our lives and showed us a new way to live I don’t believe that way anymore and I will take on anyone that even thinks about doubting my daughter’s abilities.

I am a one Mama Bear you don’t want to mess with when it comes to my baby girl. Lacey has more determination than any child I know and she is out to prove to everyone that she is not a Down syndrome child but a beautiful little girl who just happens to have Down Syndrome. It’s so hard to believe it’s been almost three years since I received news that my daughter may be different. The thought of that scared me more than anything in this world, but since that time there have been so many other things in daily life that have changed that perception. I now realize this diagnosis is not the end of the world and no one has any reason to feel sorry for us because our daughter was born with an extra chromosome. If you could just see or hold my daughter just once, you would understand that to know her is to love her.

Lacey is our ray of sunshine and she brings so much joy and love to our family. I know there have been many people who have wondered and we have even been asked, “If you had the choice, would you take away the down syndrome?” Here is my answer; If we took away Lacey’s Down syndrome then she would not be Lacey. What I would like to take away is people’s stereotypes about what Down syndrome looks like.

But the LORD said to Samuel, “Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The LORD does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance but the LORD looks at the heart.” 1 Samuel 16:7

Please enjoy the amazing speech that my 11-year-old daughter, Sydney gave at her school, which won her a speech contest.

Speech Topic:  A time when volunteers made a difference.
By: Sydney Yontz

Have you heard of Down syndrome?  I learned about Down
syndrome nine months ago, when my parents told my sister and me
about our 2 year old baby sister, Lacey.  When she was born my parents
never told us that she had Down syndrome.  I knew she had to go to
the doctor and have therapy a lot, but I just thought something was
wrong with her heart.  When my parents sat my sister and me down to
explain it to us, they told us that she had Down syndrome, which meant
she had an extra chromosome, and that she may be slow to learn things
like walking, talking, and reading.  The easiest way to explain Down
syndrome is to say my sister was born with 47 chromosomes instead of
46 like me.  She has 3 copies of her 21st chromosome.  I only have 2.

The Buddy Walk is a group that is working to bring awareness
about Down syndrome to the public.  The Buddy Walk was started in
1995 by the National Down Syndrome Society to raise awareness and
acceptance for people with Down syndrome.  The Buddy Walk is
organized by volunteers.  These volunteers get people involved to walk,
raise money, and raise awareness about Down syndrome.  These
people do not get paid any money to do this.  The payment they get is
the satisfaction of seeing all the smiling faces from the children and
adults during the event.

My mom’s friend, Kelli is the President of the Miami Valley Down
Syndrome Association.  She said they raised over $80?thousand dollars
last year for their Buddy Walk in Dayton.  The money will go to help
fund programs like summer camp, help parents pay for therapies, and
this year they will be buying iPad’s for some families. They also give 7%of the money they earned to the National Down Syndrome Society and
this money is used for research.  Nationally, the Buddy Walk raised over
$11?million dollars last year to help provide programs and services.
Back when the Buddy Walk first started they only had 17 walks
throughout the whole United States, but last year they had over 300,
and even had their first walk in the country of Japan.

So, what has the Buddy Walk done to change America?  Last year
alone, there were almost 300?thousand people that participated in the
Buddy Walk to raise money for Down syndrome.  But more importantly,
these volunteers helped raise awareness and educate millions upon
millions of others about Down syndrome.

So, why is this awareness about Down syndrome so important you
ask?  As my mom says, “my sister is part of the lucky 15% born with
Down syndrome”.  Yes, I just said my sister is lucky to be born with
Down syndrome…  You see, nearly 85% of parents when told their baby
will be born with Down syndrome, will choose to have an abortion.
Which means that the parents will end their baby’s life before it is even
born.  I can’t imagine my sister not getting a chance to live.  And I can’t
imagine my life without my sister.  She is the best sister in the world
and I love her so much.

One of my biggest fears for my sister is that someone will make
fun of her as she gets bigger, and the Buddy Walk is doing a great job in
promoting awareness so that one day my sister will be accepted by
everyone, and no one will call her mean names and make fun of her.  I
also hope that one day, with the help of the Buddy Walk that those 85%
of parents who are going to choose to end their baby’s life will go down
to zero.  Those babies deserve to be lucky too, just like my sister.

In the news…who’s to blame?

Being a parent is hard. In fact, it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done. But that’s not really saying much since I’m kinda lazy. I can admit that.

But on top of being the most difficult thing I have ever done, it is also the most important. I have heard every mom in the world say this but does everyone mean it?

I spend my days being a role model for her, regardless of if I try or not.

Audrey, this is how mommy is polite by saying “please” and “thank you”.

Audrey, this is how mommy pets the dogs nicely with soft hands.

Audrey, this is how mommy eats her snack with her mouth closed.

Audrey, this is how mommy goes peepee on the big potty.

But along with the good, our kids are also getting the bad. I can’t tell you how many times I get on Rutherford for watching his mouth…but in reality, it’s my mouth she copies more than anyones. The worst we’ve had has been me calling the cart at Babies R Us “crap” and she decided to call everything else in the store “crap” as well. In her defense, some of it was.

We, as parents, are raising little mirrors, mini me’s. If you’re going to be a wonderful, compassionate, level-headed asset to society, well so is your kid. But if you’re going to be a hate-filled, racist, disrespectful, raging a-hole, dredge on humanity…well, thank you very much for raising the next person to break into my car. My insurance company appreciates your contribution.

The reason I bring this up is because of what I saw today. Now it’s not often that I blog about current events (I stayed away from the Time cover controversy except on my Facebook page where I am a little more liberal), but this…not this I needed to address because I wanted to see what you guys thought.

Today my eyes were accosted by the video of a very nice older woman who spends her semi-retired life ensuring our middle school aged children make it safely to their destination via the big yellow school bus. Unfortunately, on this bus with her were the exact opposite of what I am trying to raise my daughter to be. On the bus with her with the type of kids I pray she rebukes, the type of kids I hope she finds repulsive and lame on the playground, the type of kids we are not raising her to be.

These kids bullied and taunted this poor woman for being “fat” until she cried and then harassed her for that, as well.

 

For 10 whole minutes. While being video taped by anther student.

That poor lady. (On a side note, there has been an outpouring of support for this woman and even a donation fund started, which at last check, totalled over $150,000.)

I have to say after watching the video, I have to commend her patience. I’m sorry but if your kid were doing this to me, I can’t guarantee I wouldn’t drop kick your kid. Not kidding. At all. And if it were my kid doing that to you, well, I give you full right to drop kid them, as well.

So whose fault is this, the parents or the kids…maybe both? Like I said, loving, attentive, involved parents don’t raise kids who think this is okay behavior. Now, I will say that good kids make mistakes but if you watch all 10 minutes of this video, you will see that this is not just a comment in poor taste or a little teasing made in a group situation. No, this is cruel, incessant, vicious bullying.

These kids, pardon my French, are assholes. And I can say this because they are old enough to know better. If you are old enough to know better but refuse to do better, you are an asshole, my friend.

Plain and simple.

Now, back to our question and I’m sure you can already see where I’m leaning. I whole heartedly see this as a parenting issue. So am I wrong? What would you do if this was your child? What type of punishment fits this crime? What would you do if this were YOU? Do you mind if I drop kick you kid if it is? (Just asking, just in case.)